programs & events

Read/Eat/Chat Book Club

Read Eat Chat - banner


Our art-themed book club is open to anyone and everyone interested in joining us.  Come to one meeting or attend them all! We read books on art, artists, museums, curators, architects, Newport and more. See below for a full schedule of upcoming books and meetings.

Read/Eat/Chat normally meets the third Thursday of the month, unless otherwise noted. 

 

Read / Eat / Chat

”Grant Wood: A Life” by R. Tripp Evans

noon     Newport Art Museum (76 Bellevue Avenue)

Join art lovers and avid readers for the monthly meeting of the Museum's book club. Read ”Grant Wood: A Life” by R. Tripp Evans, bring a lunch and discuss!

Members: Free | Non-members: $5

 

BOOK DESCRIPTION:

Wood claimed to be “the plainest kind of fellow you can find. There isn’t a single thing I’ve done, or experienced, that’s been even the least bit exciting.” He was one of America’s most famous regionalist painters; to love his work was the equivalent of loving America itself. In his time, he was an “almost mythical figure,” recognized most supremely for his hard-boiled farm scene, American Gothic, a painting that has come to reflect the essence of America’s traditional values-a simple, decent, homespun tribute to our lost agrarian age.  

 

Read / Eat / Chat

“The Devil and Dr. Barnes: Portrait of and American Art Collector” by Howard Greenfeld

noon     Newport Art Museum (76 Bellevue Avenue)

Join art lovers and avid readers for the monthly meeting of the Museum's book club. Read “The Devil and Dr. Barnes: Portrait of and American Art Collector” by Howard Greenfeld, bring a lunch and discuss!

Members: Free | Non-members: $5

 

BOOK DESCRIPTION:

Albert Coombs Barnes, one of the most eccentric, controversial figures of the early twentieth-century art world, springs vividly from the pages of  this biography. The Devil and Dr. Barnes traces the near-mythical journey of a man who was born into poverty, amassed a fortune through the promotion of a popular medicine, and acquired the premier private collection of works by such masters as Renoir, Matisse, Cézanne, and Picasso.

Ostentatiously turning his back on the art establishment, Barnes challenged the aesthetic sensibilities of an uninitiated, often resistant and scoffing, American audience. In particular, he championed Matisse, Soutine, and Modigliani when they were obscure or in difficult straits. Analyzing what he saw as the formal relationships underlying all art, linking the old and the new, Barnes applied these principles in a rigorous course of study offered at his Merion foundation.

Barnes's own mordant words, culled from the copious printed record, animate the narrative throughout, as do accounts of his associations with notables of the era--Gertrude and Leo Stein, Bertrand Russell, and John Dewey among them--many of whom he alienated with his appetite for passionate, public feuds. In this rounded portrait, Albert Barnes emerges as a complex, flawed man, who--blessed with an astute eye for greatness--has left us an incomparable treasure, gathered in one place and unforgettable to all who have seen it.

Read / Eat / Chat

“The Art of the Con: The Most Notorious Fakes, Frauds, and Forgeries in the Art World" by Anthony M. Amore

noon     Newport Art Museum (76 Bellevue Avenue)

Join art lovers and avid readers for the monthly meeting of the Museum's book club. Read “The Art of the Con: The Most Notorious Fakes, Frauds, and Forgeries in the Art World" by Anthony M. Amore, bring a lunch and discuss!

Members: Free | Non-members: $5

 

BOOK DESCRIPTION:

Art scams are today so numerous that the specter of a lawsuit arising from a mistaken attribution has scared a number of experts away from the business of authentication and forgery, and with good reason. Art scams are increasingly convincing and involve incredible sums of money. The cons perpetrated by unscrupulous art dealers and their accomplices are proportionately elaborate.

Anthony M. Amore's The Art of the Con tells the stories of some of history's most notorious yet untold cons. They involve stolen art hidden for decades; elaborate ruses that involve the Nazis and allegedly plundered art; the theft of a conceptual prototype from a well-known artist by his assistant to be used later to create copies; the use of online and television auction sites to scam buyers out of millions; and other confidence scams incredible not only for their boldness but more so because they actually worked. Using interviews and newly released court documents, The Art of the Con will also take the reader into the investigations that led to the capture of the con men, who oftentimes return back to the world of crime. For some, it's an irresistible urge because their innocent dupes all share something in common: they want to believe.